fpamed News

Staying on Track: Differentiating Between Genuine and False PTSD Claims in Railroad Litigation – Including Both Individual and Mass Tort Cases

These are the slides accompanying a presentation on “PTSD” given by forensic psychiatrist Mark I Levy MD, DLFAPA to the Association of American Railroads Claims Meeting in Nashville, Tennessee on October 12, 2016. Click here to view

Dementia Prevalence in United States Falls Between 2000 to 2012, Report Finds

Psychiatric News Alert The Voice of the American Psychiatric Association and the Psychiatric Community Dementia Prevalence in United States Falls Between 2000 to 2012, Report Finds Between 2000 and 2012, the proportion of U.S. adults 65 and older with dementia decreased significantly, from 11.6% to 8.8%, reported a study published today in JAMA Internal Medicine. […]

fpamed Forensic Psychiatrist Charles Saldanha, MD Assumes New Leadership Position

Charles Saldanha, MD has been appointed Interim Chair of Psychiatry for Alameda Health System. In this role, he will be the physician leader for an integrated public health care system that includes psychiatric emergency, inpatient psychiatry, partial hospitalization, substance use services, ambulatory and inpatient consultation and liaison psychiatry, and mental health services in a skilled […]

Minimum Insurance Benefits for the Treatment of Substance Use Disorders

CSAM Releases Results of Survey on Insurance Barriers to Medication-Assisted Treatment of Opioid Use Disorders. The California Society of Addiction Medicine (CSAM) conducted a statewide survey during the September 2016 to assess insurance barriers in California to the treatment of patients with opioid use disorders.

Mental Disorders and Other Limited Conditions – Tackling the Challenges of Handling Mental/Nervous Claims and Establishing Objective Proof of Subjective, “Non-Visible” Disorders

Forensic Psychiatrist, Mark I Levy, MD and Forensic Neuropsychologist, Ronald H. Roberts, PhD have presented to the American Conference Institute program on “Disability Litigation” on September 15, 2016 in Boston, MA. Click here to download pdf sides from the presentation.

Staying On Track: PTSD – American Association of Railroads General Claims Meeting

Click here to download a pdf of the Powerpoint presentation “Staying On Track: Differentiating Between Genuine and False PTSD Claims in Railroad Litigation” given by Mark I Levy MD at the October 12, 2016 the General Claims Meeting of the American Association of Railroads in Nashville, TN.

DID THE BATON ROUGE KILLER HAVE PTSD?

Forensic Psychiatrist Mark I. Levy MD was interviewed on July 20, 2016 for the following television news story: By KTVU Reporter Tom Vacar There are reports that the man who killed three Baton Rouge law enforcement officers told friends he was suffering from PTSD, post traumatic stress disorder. So, I spoke with two of the […]

Staying on Track: Differentiating Between Genuine and False PTSD Claims in Railroad Litigation

Slide show for Mark I Levy MD DLFAPA and Ronald H. Roberts PhD, AAPP, presenters at NARTC Annual Meeting, Westin St. Francis Hotel, San Francisco, CA July 25, 2016, 9:00 a.m. Click here to download pdf of slides

Blast TBI May Do Distinct Damage in Brain

—Mark I Levy, MD An article featured on 6-29-16 in the online medical journal MedPage Today reports recent neurological studies on post-mortem examinations of the brains of soldiers who survived blast trauma in combat. The study highlights “Specific astroglial scar pattern seen in postmortem exams” of these soldiers that appear to be unique to blast […]

How Should Scientific Research be Presented to Judges and Juries?

by Mark Levy MD I recently read an interesting Blogpost by psychologist-attorney Christina Marinakis, J.D., Psy.D. who is the Director of Jury Research, at the website Litigation Insights. The post was entitled “How Should Scientific Research be Presented to Judges and Juries?” The author reviews that “In 1923, the federal courts adopted a general acceptance […]

Psychology of Millennials and the Legal Process: 2 blogpost by A2L Consulting

Recently, a legal blog that I follow, A2L Consulting, posted two very interesting commentaries on the Millennial generation describing ways in which their attitudes, values and behavior differ from the behavior and attitudes of Baby Boomers and the GenX cohort and how those differences may influence Millennial behavior within the context of legal processes. Both […]

Benefits of Taking Antidepressants During Pregnancy Outweigh Risks, Expert Says

According to Psychiatric News Alert, The Voice of the American Psychiatric Association and the Psychiatric Community, an expert on women’s health has reported that the Benefits of Taking Antidepressants During Pregnancy Outweigh Risks. According to the alert, As conflicting studies about the risk of birth defects in offspring of women who use antidepressants during pregnancy […]

Framingham Study Suggests Dementia Rates May Be Falling

The American Psychiatric Association has issued the following Psychiatric News Alert of a falling incidence of dementia based upon new data from the legendary Framingham Heart Study that started in Boston almost a half century ago. Framingham Study Suggests Dementia Rates May Be Falling Many experts predict that as people live longer, the prevalence of […]

When The Hospital Fires the Bullet….

The 2/13/16 New York Times article “When the Hospital Fires the Bullet” tells the truly incredible story of a Houston college student who had never been in trouble and was admitted to a local inpatient psychiatric facility for symptoms of the manic phase of his bipolar disorder. In an effort to subdue this student’s classically […]

Heart Rate and Behavioral Medicine

An interesting editorial in the October 2015 issue of JAMA Psychiatry entitled “Low Resting Heart Rate as an Unequivocal Risk Factor for Both the Perpetration of and Exposure to Violence” is a remarkable announcement of a biomarker for predicting which child or adolescent is most likely to behave violently and/or become a victim of violence. […]

Risk of Suicide Increases 3-Fold After Concussion

An February 8, 2016 article in the Canadian Medical Association Journal entitled “Risk of Suicide After Concussion” suggests that there is an increase of suicidal behavior post concussion, especially on weekend. Most of the attempted and completed suicides visited a physician shortly before attempting to take their own life. The “take-away” from this article is […]

Managing the Suicidal College Student: Advice for Community Providers

A long and thoughtful article in the Psychiatric Times from November 23, 2015 discusses the problems of college student suicide and provides “advice for community providers.” This is obviously a clinical as well as a forensic psychiatric issue. We are providing a link to the original article here for the interest of our blog readers. […]

Addressing Extremism

A White Paper entitled “Addressing Extremism” authored by The Institute for Conflict Analysis and Resolution (ICAR), George Mason University’s Dr Andrea Bartoli, and Dr. Peter T. Coleman, ICCCR, Teachers College, Columbia University, attempts to analyze the nature of extremism both in general and in the particular form that is radicalizing many seemingly mentally healthy young […]

Comment on “Lucid Interval” in Dementia & Questions of Testamentary Capacity

In an article appearing in the most recent issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law (JAAPL) (September 1, 2015 vol. 43 no. 3 287-292), by Shulman, Hull, et al., entitled “Cognitive Fluctuations and the Lucid Interval in Dementia: Implications for Testamentary Capacity,” the authors introduce a significant new challenge […]

Head of Mental Health Institute Leaving for Google Life Sciences By BENEDICT CAREY

From The New York Times…

Depression Literally Colors the Way We See the World

An interesting finding: According to a recent Huffington Post article, “Depression Literally Colors the Way We See the World,” feeling states affect our capacity to perceive color tones. This article was based upon a scientific study that was published recently in the journal Psychological Science entitled “Sadness Impairs Color Perception.” As supportive anecdotal evidence, an […]

How to Halt the Violence

On the August 29, 2015 New York Times op ed page, Jeffrey Lieberman, MD, Chairman of the Department of Psychiatry at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, wrote an op-ed article entitled “How to Halt the Violence.” It is a superb effort to address head on the pointless 24 hour news cycle hand wringing […]

Antidepressants Affect Morality And Decision-Making, New Study Finds

An interesting study of the sociology of antidepressants performed by researchers at University College London and Oxford University was published in the journal Cell Biology. Researchers found that a serotonergic antidepressant drug (citalopram – Celexa) increased the desire to avoid harm to oneself and creased the tendency to inflict harm on others and a dopaminergic […]

Can the Bacteria In Your Gut Explain Your Mood

In an intriguing June 23, 2015 New York Times article with the provocative title, “Can the Bacteria In Your Gut Explain Your Mood,” the science journalist Peter Andrey Smith explores the hypothesis that among the myriad of microbes in our intestines, some manufacture neurochemicals that may well affect the neurochemistry in our brains just as […]

Assessing Emotional Damages Claims of a Population in Multi-Plaintiff Litigation

fpamed Forensic neuropsychologist Ronald Roberts PhD and Forensic Psychiatrist Mark Levy MD, DLFAPA presented on July 2, 2015 to the National CDL Practice Group of the Seyfarth Shaw, LLP law firm, a discussion entitled “Assessing Emotional Damages Claims of a Population in Multi-Plaintiff Litigation.” A pdf of the powerpoint slides for that presentation can be […]